The Research

Report on violence in schools of India

Corporal punishment is a type of violence against children, either in form of physical force or mental harassment, that comes under the pretext of “punishment.” Until now, there has been little effort to understand why it remains epidemic in our schools, despite being illegal, what factors put children at risk to receive punishment by teachers, and what are the possible leverages to eliminate this menace systematically and culturally.

Our report addresses this gap and provides insight into how and why marginalised children whose parents have migrated to the semi-urban villages of Gurugram experience corporal punishment at school. We have collected data from 29 children in a role play, 40 children in personal interviews, 29 parents in focus group discussions and seasonal calendar exercise, and 12 government school teachers in group interviews. To estimate the scale of the problem in Gurugram, we also surveyed 500 children and 100 parents sampled randomly.

Our report addresses this gap and provides insight into how and why marginalised children whose parents have migrated to the semi-urban villages of Gurugram experience corporal punishment at school. We have collected data from 29 children in a role play, 40 children in personal interviews, 29 parents in focus group discussions and seasonal calendar exercise, and 12 government school teachers in group interviews. To estimate the scale of the problem in Gurugram, we also surveyed 500 children and 100 parents sampled randomly.

Our research has brought to light alarming results. For example, 75% of marginalised children are beaten by their teachers regularly, many of them every day. The large majority of students don't tell their parents because they might beat them too. Marginalised children experience significantly more punishment by teachers, often in form of severe violence and degrading mental harassment, due to their low-income and “migrant” background, the dire conditions in government schools, and due to our social norms that justify certain forms of violence, especially against children from the lower strata of our society.

In light of these findings, we have launched a nation wide effort - “Kaagaz Ki Kashti” - to eliminate corporal punishment from the schools of India. Our objective is to create a learning environment for our children in which they can study free from violence and fear. This is based on the values of Indian constitution, our laws and the Sustainable Development Goal - 16.2 that mandates us to end “all forms of violence and torture against children by 2030.”

Download the full report

Media Coverage of the research

|| IndiaSpend ............"Blamed For Their Parents’ Poverty, 80% Of Marginalised Indian Children Experience Corporal Punishment In School"

|| CNN News 18 ............"Disadvantaged Children Bear the Brunt of Corporal Punishment in Schools: Report"

|| Business Standard ............"88% of marginalised children beaten at school; 91% parents okay with it"

|| The Freepress Journal ............"Carefree childhood is a joke"

|| Hindustan Times ............"80% of students from EWS beaten in Gurugram government schools: Report"

|| Mid Day ............"Why Government Schools Are Highly Unsafe For Kids"

|| Times Now (Mirror Now) ............"Choking Childhood: 80% students of economically weaker sections are beaten at govt schools in Gurugram"

Click to know about our efforts for eliminating corporal punishment from schools of India